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High Performance Polymers: Meet the Experts at OTC 2019 in Houston, TX

Houston, TX– 4/18/19- Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials formerly known asQuadrant Engineering Plastic Products (EPP), theleading global manufacturer of high-performance thermoplastic materials, visits the 2019 Offshore Technology Conference (OTC)this May to showcase the latest innovations in advanced engineering grade plastics, polymers, and composites for offshore technology. Known as the energy industry’s premier global event, the annual petrochemical conference drew over 60,000 professionals from more than 100 countries in 2018. 

Finished part solutions and stock shapes available from Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialshelp global clients in the compressor, valve and pump markets to find the right material for their specific applications. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials polymer labyrinth seals, for example, have been specially designed for the turbo compressor market. The seals have 15+ years proven performance, reducing tolerance or maintaining original tolerance over their lifetime, providing improved compressor efficiency. Testing has shown that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced MaterialsDuratron® sealsvirtually eliminate tooth deformation and mating shaft damage during shaft rubs, common in metal and alloy seals.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials comply with many common industry specifications, including NORSOK, ISO, ACME, API, and NACE, delivering reliability, safety, and efficiency. In an industry with strict requirements for temperatures, loads, and chemicals, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialsdelivers a superior and vast portfolio of products.Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is committed to the accuracy of thermoplastics data for more successful specification writing.Our in-house lab machine-tests samples from the actual post-process stock shapes to ensure our customers receive materials that are on-spec and comply with ASTM/ISO standards.  In the oil and gas industries, where part failure can be particularly disastrous (leaks leading to environmental damage; lost revenue due to downtime; and even death), specifying the right material is critical.

OTC is sponsored by 13 different industry organizations and societies. Founded in 1969, the annual conference is the leading forum to exchange ideas and opinions advancing thesafe, environmentally friendly, and sustainable development of offshore resources. The conference consists of panel sessions, keynote presentations, technical paper presentations, and networking events.

Visit Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialsat the 2019 Offshore Technology Conference (booth #173) at NRG Park in Houston, Texas from May 6th– 9th, 2019. Application specialists and technical experts will be on-site to answer questions.

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials:

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialstechnology is backed by a global team of application development and technical service engineers, specializing in evaluating designs and fabrication techniques. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialsexpertise is available through a worldwide network of branch offices, technical support centers, and authorized dealers. Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialsat mcam.com or connect with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materialson Facebook, Linkedin, and Twitter.

Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duraspin®, Duratron®, Erta®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®, Ertalon®, Extreme Materials®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, MC®, Monocast®, Nylatron®, Nylasteel®, Polypenco®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR® and Vibratuf® are registered trademarks of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials group of companies.

Press Contact: Kathena Siegel, Marketing Communications Coordinator, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials,Reading, PA, Tel: 610 320 6600, Email: Kathena.Siegel@mcam.com

COMPANY NAME CHANGE: Effective Today, April 1, 2019, Quadrant Is Now Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials

4/1/2019- Reading, PA- Quadrant is now officially Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials, effective today. This is a crucial stepping stone in the history of the Quadrant Group, which includes- EPP and CMS- as the name, Mitsubishi Chemical, is part of their new corporate identity, with additional designation. Advanced Materials accurately represents the company’s diverse capabilities, and will allow them to continue their existence as a group under the umbrella of their parent company, Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation. Product brands such as Ketron®, MediTECH®, SymaLITE®, TIVAR®, Ertalyte®, Ertalon®, and Symalit etc. will remain unaffected and continue to be used to distribute Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials products under the same specifications into customer channels.

Michael Koch, Global CEO, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials, says “This name change brings the strengths and potential of two companies together. Mitsubishi partnered with the Quadrant Group to leverage their proven track record of generating solutions for customers. Now that the extensive list of products and solutions that Mitsubishi has in their portfolio are available, the company can venture into other market segments and applications that were untouchable before. With this name change, everything is being brought under one roof to customers.”

Quadrant’s identity as a member of the Mitsubishi Chemical Group has permeated throughout the industry, which is why they feel that it is appropriate to make the transition over to Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials immediately. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials provides an organizational structure that can take full advantage of the existing resources and strengths, in order to address a rapidly changing business climate and drive the opportunities for advancements that they see on the horizon.

Bernie Willms, North American President, says “The change in name will not change our desire and drive to bring our customers improved service and products to help support profitable growth. Our commitment to our partners and our focus to work together is unwavering. We look forward to our future, together.”

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials will continue to enhance their high-performance thermoplastic materials business and strive to realize “KAITEKI”.

KAITEKI is an original concept of the Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings Group that proposes a way forward in the sustainable development of society and the planet, in addition to serving as a guide for solving environmental and social issues.

The entire company is proud of this significant milestone and are ready to continue the expansion of our product portfolio as Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials.

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials

With more than 80 years of experience, 30 branch offices in 20 countries, and a team of technical service experts, engineers, and application development managers, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is the global leader for researching, developing, and manufacturing high-performance engineered polymer materials. Our products make the world a safer place by providing solutions across all industries- food processing and packaging, aerospace and defense, semiconductor, chemical processing, life sciences, renewable energy, construction and heavy equipment, and electronics.

For more information, please visit MCAM.com and follow our social media pages: Twitter, Linkedin, Facebook

Registered trademarks of Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials include: Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duratron®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®,. Ertalon®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, Nylatron®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR®

 

Media Contact

Kathena Siegel

Marketing

Kathena.Siegel@mcam.com | 610.320.6742

Efficiency With A Global Reach: Innovative Solutions from Plastics Leader MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS at TPS 2018

Houston, TX —September 13, 2018 —Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (EPP), the leading global manufacturer of high-performance thermoplastic materials, will exhibit at the 2018 Turbomachinery & Pump Symposia (TPS) in September and showcase innovative materials for static and dynamic high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) applications. TPS is a vital industry event, offering a forum for the exchange of ideas between rotating equipment engineers and technicians worldwide. Now surpassing 46 years, TPS is known for its impact on turbomachinery, pump, oil & gas, petrochemical, power, aerospace, chemical and water industries through two pathways: the technical program and exhibition.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is the global leader in providing polymer materials to the compressor and pump market, supplying stock shapes as well as finished part solutions. Our solutions for upstream, midstream, and downstream processes provide efficiency through tighter tolerances and lower wear materials; reduce weight and power requirements through the switch from metal to plastic; and reduce VOC emissions through superior seal elements leading to fewer leaks.

Combined with reduced friction and superior coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE), Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials thermoplastic materials can increase equipment lifetime as well as cut down on lost production time due to repairs. Our materials comply with many industry specifications—including NORSOK, ISO, ANSI, ACME, API, and NACE—delivering reliability, safety, and efficiency.

Featured materials offering reliability and cost savings include:

  • Duratron® PAI - Testing has shown that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Duratron® seals virtually eliminate the tooth deformation and mating shaft damage that is common with metal and alloy seals.
  • Fluorosint® PTFE - Exceptional Dimensional Stability for Precise Tolerance Control.
  • Ketron® PEEK - Components machined from Ketron® PEEK improve performance and reliability.

Inspired by the challenges faced by design engineers, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials continues to meet and exceed end-user demands for performance and efficiency gains with engineered polymers. Our global technical service teams support customers around the world, providing full material seminars, individual application assistance, or part validation assistance. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s global stocking warehouses and distribution networks ensure that our clients have access to solutions and innovative materials for all of their Petrochemical challenges.

Visit Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at the 2018 Turbomachinery & Pump Symposia (booth #2243), September 18 – 20 at Texas A & M University in Houston, TX. Application specialists and technical experts will be on-site to answer questions.

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials technology is backed by a global team of application development and technical service engineers, specializing in evaluating designs and fabrication techniques. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials expertise is available through a worldwide network of branch offices, technical support centers, and authorized dealers. Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at www.mcam.com or connect with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter ("quadrantepp”).

Registered trademarks of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials group of companies: Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duraspin®, Duratron®, Erta®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®, Ertalon®, Extreme Materials®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, MC®, Monocast®, Nylatron®, Nylasteel®, Polypenco®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR® and Vibratuf®.

Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, 610-320-6624, douglas.mahler@mcam.com

 

Thermoplastics for Food Technology—Global Leader MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Showcases Solutions at PACK EXPO International 2018

Chicago, IL – September 12, 2018 Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials), the leading global supplier of high-performance thermoplastic materials, will be exhibiting at PACK EXPO International 2018 this October. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s experts will be at the show to showcase their innovative thermoplastic solutions for the Food Processing, Packaging, and Conveyance Industries.

PACK EXPO 2018 attracts professionals from all segments of the global food and beverage industry who are in search of processing and packaging solutions. This includes individuals in engineering, operations, maintenance, production, R&D, quality assurance, marketing, sales, and corporate management.

Environmentally sensitive and highly regulated, the food production and packaging sectors require specific solutions. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s portfolio of materials developed for food contact, including a comprehensive “Food Grade” family, aim to reduce maintenance costs and increase productivity while keeping consumer and employee safety at the forefront.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s food compliant materials—FDA, CFIA, NSF, USDA, 3A-SSI, and EU STD certified—provide improved productivity and product lifetime through reduced friction and wear. Self-lubricating formulations lower maintenance costs and lower the risk of lubrication contamination.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s 3-WAY detectable plastics portfolio includes a core group of compliant materials designed to increase up-time and throughput in today’s food handling, manipulation, and processing environments. These materials are blue in color, X-ray detectable, metal detectable, and visually detectable. Durable and stable, field tests prove Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials have superior performance in extreme environments.

“As food safety regulations and stringent government guidelines continue to increase in importance, so does keeping foreign material out of food ingredients, says Paul Canacas, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Global Market Segment Manager. “Plastics are becoming more prevalent in the food industry, which is why it is crucial to have materials that are detectable with a variety of systems. As manufacturing environments and detection technologies vary from company to company, we must adjust accordingly with even more material detectability capabilities." 

Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s innovative family of food compliant thermoplastics at PACK EXPO 2018 (booth #9437 – Lower Lakeside Center) at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois from October 14-17, 2018. Application specialists and technical experts will be available on-site to answer questions and provide guidance.

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials:

For over 70 years, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials) has been proving there is simply no substitute for quality and innovation. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is the global leader in research, development, and manufacture of machinable, high-performance engineering polymer materials. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials are specified for use in food processing and packaging, semiconductor manufacturing, aerospace, electronics, chemical processing, life sciences, power generation, and diverse industrial equipment. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials products range from UHMW polyethylene, nylon, and acetal to ultra-high performance polymers that resist temperatures to over 800°F (425°C).

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials technology is backed by a global team of application development and technical service engineers, specializing in evaluating designs and fabrication techniques. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials expertise is available through a worldwide network of branch offices, technical support centers, and authorized dealers. Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at www.mcam.com or connect with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter ("quadrantepp”).

Registered trademarks of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials group of companies: Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duraspin®, Duratron®, Erta®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®, Ertalon®, Extreme Materials®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, MC®, Monocast®, Nylatron®, Nylasteel®, Polypenco®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR® and Vibratuf®.

Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, 610-320-6624, douglas.mahler@mcam.com

 

Global Plastics Leader MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Brings Innovative Plastic & Polymer Materials to SEMICON West 2018

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (EPP), leading global supplier of high-performance thermoplastic materials, visits SEMICON West 2018 this July to showcase their innovative Engineering Plastic Materials for the Semiconductor and Electronics industries.

As the design of semiconductor IC chips continue to become smaller and their data processing capabilities grow, innovative materials are required to meet the changing needs of these industries. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials are specifically designed to perform in the latest wafer processing and chip testing environments—meeting the strictest requirements for purity and consistency in manufacturing. These new materials are focused on delivering low-cost solutions in all facets of the Semiconductor manufacturing process. In addition to their full portfolio, SEMICON West 2018 will highlight the newest additions to Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s machinable plastic line, including:

  • SEMITRON® HPV PEEK- An extruded Static Dissipative PEEK based polymer system developed specifically for electronic fixture applications that require a high degree of dimensional stability over an extended thermal range as well as precise machine-ability.
  • SEMITRON® POM CNT- An extruded Static Dissipative POM C based polymer system developed specifically for electronic fixture applications that require a precise surface resistivity range yet offering increased dimensional stability vs conventional POM ESd products.

SEMICON West 2018 will focus on issues facing the future of the semiconductor manufacturing industry, including sessions covering Smart Transportation, Smart Manufacturing, MedTech, Big Data, IoT, and the cognitive technologies that are transforming the world make this year’s Expo like no other before.

“We’re seeing smarter, faster, and more powerful electronic products,” says Scott Williams, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Global Strategic Marketing Manager. “Our materials can facilitate all of that growth while still keeping affordability at the forefront.”

Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s innovative family of materials at SEMICON West 2018 (booth #439) at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, CA from July 10-12, 2018. Application specialists and technical experts will be available on-site to answer questions and provide guidance for engineering and application solutions. 

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials:

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials technology is backed by a global team of application development and technical service engineers, specializing in evaluating designs and fabrication techniques. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials expertise is available through a worldwide network of branch offices, technical support centers, and authorized dealers. Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at www.mcam.com or connect with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter ("quadrantepp”).

Registered trademarks of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials group of companies: Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duraspin®, Duratron®, Erta®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®, Ertalon®, Extreme Materials®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, MC®, Monocast®, Nylatron®, Nylasteel®, Polypenco®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR® and Vibratuf®.

Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, Tel: 610 320 6624, Email: douglas.mahler@mcam.com

MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Demonstrates Commitment to Quality, Earns ISO 9001:2015 Certification

Reading, PA – June 12, 2018 – Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (EPP), the leading global manufacturer of high-performance thermoplastic materials, has earned the Management System Certificate ISO 9001:2015, demonstrating a commitment to quality.

The standard, issued by ISO (an independent, non-governmental, global network of national standards bodies), provides guidance and tools for companies and organizations who want to ensure that their products and services consistently meet customer’s requirements, and that quality is consistently improved. This new version of the standard has recently replaced the previous version (ISO 9001:2008).

Valid through April 11, 2021, the Management System Certificate includes Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials locations in Reading, Scranton, and Delmont, PA; Wytheville, VA; and Fort Wayne, IN, and applies to the sales, marketing, manufacturing, servicing, and distribution of engineering plastic stock shaped (rod, tube, plate), machined shapes, and various Thermoplastics and Thermosets.

Based on a number of quality management principles, including a strong customer focus, the motivation and implication of top management, the process approach, and continual improvement, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s ISO 9001:2015 certification is confirmation from a third-party body that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials products and services are of world-class quality and reliability.

The certification helps Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials put customers first by ensuring efficiency and productivity through process alignment, identification and mitigation of organizational risks, putting a greater emphasis on leadership engagement, and addressing supply chain management.

One of ISO’s best known standards, there are over one million companies and organizations in over 170 countries certified to ISO 9001. Learn more about the quality management system standard at https://www.iso.org/iso-9001-quality-management.html.

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials technology is backed by a global team of application development and technical service engineers, specializing in evaluating designs and fabrication techniques. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials expertise is available through a worldwide network of branch offices, technical support centers, and authorized dealers. Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at www.mcam.com or connect with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter ("quadrantepp”).

Registered trademarks of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials group of companies: Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duraspin®, Duratron®, Erta®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®, Ertalon®, Extreme Materials®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, MC®, Monocast®, Nylatron®, Nylasteel®, Polypenco®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR® and Vibratuf®.

Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, Tel: 610 320 6624, Email: douglas.mahler@mcam.com

 

MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Showcases Fluorosint® Enhanced PTFE Thermoplastic Solutions at 2018 Global Petroleum Show

CALGARY, CA — June 6, 2018 —Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (EPP), the leading global manufacturer of high-performance thermoplastic materials, will exhibit at the 2018 Global Petroleum Show (GPS) in June and showcase innovative materials for static and dynamic high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP) applications. GPS is North America’s leading energy event, where oil and gas professionals convene to engage in dialogue, create partnerships, and identify the solutions and strategies that will shape the oil and gas industry.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is the global leader in engineering plastics used in HTHP oil and gas applications, including seals, shrouds, bushings, bearings, and other rotational wear components. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Fluorosint® Enhanced PTFE offers a higher load carry capability and lower coefficient of thermal expansion when compared to PTFE, with 1/9 of the deformation under load. The result of a proprietary process in which synthetically manufactured mica is chemically linked to virgin PTFE, engineers and designers have long recognized the performance benefits of Fluorosint® 500 and 207, as well as the entire Fluorosint® family of materials (HPV, MT-01, and 135).

Fluorosint® 500 is widely used for seals, shrouds, and bearings in some of the world's most sophisticated rotating equipment. Non-abrasive on most mating materials, its coefficient of linear thermal expansion approaches the expansion rate of aluminum and is 1/5 that of virgin PTFE—often eliminating fit and clearance problems.

Fluorosint® 207 is specified for seals, scrapers, and wear surfaces in food processing and production equipment around the world. Unmatched in dimensional stability with excellent creep resistance and a unique white color, Fluorosint® 207 is non-permeable in steam and complies with the FDA's regulation 21 CFR 175.300.

With a longstanding record of success, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials continues to exceed client demands for performance and efficiency gains with engineered polymers in semi-finished products and finished parts. Inspired by the challenges faced by design engineers, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials continuously works to develop new materials and improved processes. Innovation is seen not only as a key driver for growth within the company, but also a core competency—allowing Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials to form collaborative partnerships with clients and customers.

Visit Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at the 2018 Global Petroleum Show (booth #1803), June 12-14 at Stampede Park in Calgary, Canada. Application specialists and technical experts will be on-site to answer questions.

Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, Tel: 610 320 6624, Email: douglas.mahler@mcam.com

High Performance Polymers: Meet the MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Experts at OTC 2018 in Houston, TX

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (EPP), the leading global manufacturer of high-performance thermoplastic materials, visits the 2018 Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) this April to showcase the latest innovations in advanced engineering grade plastics, polymers, and composites for offshore technology. Known as the energy industry’s premier global event, the annual petrochemical conference drew over 70,000 professionals from more than 100 countries in 2017.

Finished part solutions and stock shapes available from Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials help global clients in the compressor, valve and pump markets to find the right material for their specific applications. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s polymer labyrinth seals, for example, have been specially designed for the turbo compressor market. The seals have 15+ years proven performance, reducing tolerance or maintaining original tolerance over their lifetime, providing improved compressor efficiency. Testing has shown that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Duratron® seals virtually eliminate tooth deformation and mating shaft damage during shaft rubs, common in metal and alloy seals.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials comply with many common industry specifications, including NORSOK, ISO, ACME, API, and NACE, delivering reliability, safety, and efficiency. In an industry with strict requirements for temperatures, loads, and chemicals, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials delivers a superior and vast portfolio of products. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is committed to the accuracy of thermoplastics data for more successful specification writing. Our in-house lab machine-tests samples from the actual post-process stock shapes to ensure our customers receive materials that are on-spec and comply with ASTM/ISO standards. In the oil and gas industries, where part failure can be particularly disastrous (leaks leading to environmental damage; lost revenue due to downtime; and even death), specifying the right material is critical.

OTC is sponsored by 13 different industry organizations and societies. Founded in 1969, the annual conference is the leading forum to exchange ideas and opinions advancing the safe, environmentally friendly, and sustainable development of offshore resources. The conference consists of panel sessions, keynote presentations, technical paper presentations, and networking events.

Visit Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at the 2018 Offshore Technology Conference (booth #161) at NRG Park in Houston, Texas from April 30th – May 3rd, 2018. Application specialists and technical experts will be on-site to answer questions.

About Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials:

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials technology is backed by a global team of application development and technical service engineers, specializing in evaluating designs and fabrication techniques. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials expertise is available through a worldwide network of branch offices, technical support centers, and authorized dealers. Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials at www.mcam.com or connect with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter ("quadrantepp”).

Registered trademarks of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials group of companies: Acetron®, CleanStat®, Duraspin®, Duratron®, Erta®, Ertalyte®, Ertalene®, Ertalon®, Extreme Materials®, Fluorosint®, Ketron®, MC®, Monocast®, Nylatron®, Nylasteel®, Polypenco®, Proteus®, Sanalite®, Semitron®, Techtron®, TIVAR® and Vibratuf®.

Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, Tel: 610 320 6624, Email: douglas.mahler@mcam.com

MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Sheet: Meeting NexGen Performance Demands for Semiconductor Machined Burn-In and Test Sockets

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials has a long and successful history of supplying our sheet materials to fabricators and OEMs for precision machined semiconductor chip burn-in and test sockets. Duratron® T4203 PAI, Ketron® 1000 PEEK, Duratron® U1000 PEI, and Duratron® T5030 PAI, and Duratron® D7000 PI have each established successful specification standards for IC test sockets over the years, with many still in use today. New semiconductor chip designs, however, have increasingly critical property demands...

  • Flexural Modulus - Higher values are critical for managing the robustness of the finished socket under test conditions
  • Tensile Elongation - Lower values are critical for controlling the accuracy of holes during machining
  • CLTE - Lower rates are critical for providing dimensional stability over a varied temperature range during usage
  • Polymer Melting Point - Critical for clean thru holes during drilling
  • Moisture Absorption - Low rate is critical for maintaining dimensional stability

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s ongoing product research and development has created NexGen Socket Materials to satisfy the most demanding new critical requirements:

  • Semitron® MP370 sheet serves as an excellent first performance step up from past standard socket materials, including polyimides. Semitron® MP370 displays very low levels of moisture absorption, low tensile elongation, and high stiffness (without fiber). It produces parts with enhanced dimensional stability and hole machining accuracy. It is supplied in ¼”, 3/8”, and ½” standard thicknesses.
  • Semitron® MDS100 sheet provides extremely high flexural modulus properties in a non-fiber filled sheet. Coupled with very low CLTE and moisture absorption ratings, Semitron® MDS 100 will meet your most demanding dimensional stability designs, while providing excellent machinability of fine features. It is available in 1mm, 2mm, 3mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, and 9mm standard thicknesses.
  • Kyron® GC100 sheet has been developed to complement the thin Semitron® MDS100 high-performance sheets listed above. It is a very high flex modulus, non-fiber filled material with a low CLTE and low tensile elongation. This combination of properties provides Kyron® GC100 sheet with excellent machinability and hole placement accuracy. It is available in 6mm, 9mm, and 12mm standard thicknesses, and 2mm thick on a custom basis.

While Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials offers an extensive range of sheet products for test socket and burn-in needs, the chart below will help you choose the best material for your particular socket design needs.

                       

To identify candidate materials for your specific application:

  1. Determine which of the 3 colored grid sections apply to your needs (Basic, Challenging, or Demanding) based on your listed hole and pitch sizes.
  2. Next locate best likely candidate materials in your grid color based on your required “Polymeric Stability” (a formula that combines CLTE and stiffness) and “Machinability Rating” (a formula which combines heat resistance, ductility, and fill.

*Example: While “Polyimide” has a high “Machinability” rating (due to high heat resistance, ductility, and lack of filler), it has a very low “Polymeric Stability” (due to high CLTE and low stiffness, typically not properties you want in a typical high-performance socket application requiring tight tolerances and dimensional stability). By comparison, Semitron® MDS100 and Kyron® GC100 both have relatively lower “Machinability” ratings than Polyimide, but possess the highest “Polymeric Stability” ratings, making them excellent candidates for your most demanding socket applications.

Looking for additional assistance? Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials has a full technical team, at our factory and in the field, to further assist you with all of your Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials material selection and design needs. Contact us TODAY!


Gary Clauss
- Application Development Manager/Yorba Linda, CA

 

ANNOUNCEMENT: Brand Change Within the NYLATRON® PA6 Group of Products

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials) announces a brand change within its Nylatron® product family effective immediately: Formerly known Nylatron® LFG now becomes Nylatron® SLG-FDA PA6.
Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials's well-established Nylatron® LFG brand (“Lubricated Food Grade”) will continue under the new Nylatron® SLG-FDA PA6 (“Self-Lubricated Grade”) product name in North America.
The change is based on the increasingly frequent confusion concerning the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials "Food Grade" group of products and global compliance. This group, which has meanwhile become well-known under the abbreviation "FG", has been specifically developed to meet the requirements of the USFDA (United States Food & Drug Administration) for food contact. Nylatron SLG-FDA is clearly branded to remove doubt of compliance. We feel this is critical at Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials, as regional and global compliance continues to evolve and become more stringent and complex.
This is solely a name change and will not affect the property, color, formula or performance of Nylatron SLG-FDA PA6.
To learn more about Nylatron® SLG-FDA PA6 please contact your local Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials representative or visit www.mcam.com.


Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, 610-320-6624, douglas.mahler@mcam.com

Efficiency With A Global Reach

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials), leading global supplier of high-performance thermoplastic materials, visits the 46th Turbomachinery & 33rd International Pump Users Symposia (TPS 2017) this December to showcase the latest innovations in advanced engineering grade plastics, polymers, and composites for global Petrochemical challenges. TPS 2017 is the premier conference for Turbomachinery and Pump professionals and will draw over 5,000 attendees.

In industries that call for extreme temperatures, loads, and chemicals (including Oil & Gas; Chemical/Petrochemical; Power; Manufacturing; Mining/Metals; Water; Industrial Gas; and Refining), thermoplastic solutions can improve efficiency and reduce mean time between repair.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is the global leader in providing polymer materials to the compressor and pump market, supplying stock shapes as well as finished part solutions. Our solutions for upstream, midstream, and downstream processes provide efficiency through tighter tolerances and lower wear materials; reduce weight and power requirements through the switch from metal to plastic; and reduce VOC emissions through superior seal elements leading to fewer leaks.

Combined with reduced friction and superior coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE), Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials thermoplastic materials can increase equipment lifetime as well as cut down on lost production time due to repairs. Our materials comply with many industry specifications—including NORSOK, ISO, ANSI, ACME, API, and NACE—delivering reliability, safety, and efficiency.

Selected products and applications of interest to TPS 2017 attendees include:

Inspired by the challenges faced by design engineers, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials continues to meet and exceed end-user demands for performance and efficiency gains with engineered polymers. Our global technical service teams support customers around the world, providing full material seminars, individual application assistance, or part validation assistance. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s global stocking warehouses and distribution networks ensure that our clients have access to solutions and innovative materials for all of their Petrochemical challenges.

Learn more about Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s innovative family of materials at TPS 2017 (booth #2041) at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas from December 12-14, 2017. Application specialists and technical experts will be available on-site to answer questions and provide guidance.


Press Contact: Doug Mahler, Product Marketing Manager, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials USA, Inc. Reading, PA, 610-320-6624, douglas.mahler@mcam.com

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Plastics in Cold Temperatures
TECH TALK: Minimum Service Temperature of Engineering Thermoplastic

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials often receives questions like “What’s the minimum service temperature of material X?” or “I’m looking for a plastic material that can handle temperatures as low as -50°C/-60°F in my application.” These questions are difficult to answer since thermoplastics actually have no absolute minimum service temperature.

That’s right. There is no universal test standard or method1 to qualify the minimum service temperature of engineering thermoplastics. When consulting different sources, one might find conflicting values for the same thermoplastic material. Minimum service temperature values found in literature or data sheets are typically based on user experience or manufacturer recommendation.

So, what is minimum service temperature, anyway? In most cases, it can be considered as the temperature at which a material can be used without becoming too brittle. As temperatures decrease, thermoplastic materials generally show higher mechanical strength and stiffness while simultaneously becoming more brittle.

It should be noted that the term “too brittle” is difficult to define since this value will depend on the design of the plastic component and the load conditions (static or dynamic) in any given application. The “brittleness” of various thermoplastic materials should be considered as a relative—rather than an absolute—measure. For example, a particular thermoplastic material may perform well as a component in a structural application with moderate load operating at -50°C/-60°F, but that same material could fail in an application operating at -20°C/-5°F where the plastic component is subjected to impact.

Changing process parameters or including additives like plasticizers, glass fibers, carbon fibers, etc can also modify engineering thermoplastics. This will impact the material’s physical properties and ultimately alter the toughness/ductility of the material.

For harder and more brittle materials to be used in applications involving dynamic loading and/or impact at lower temperatures, the design of the component becomes more important. In cases like these, one should try to eliminate sharp edges and internal corners (by applying proper radiuses), stress points, and threads, in order to improve the cold temperature performance of a plastic component.

Table 1 provides values for the minimum service temperature of some common Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Engineering Plastics. As stated above, these values should not be considered as absolute practical limits. The function of a plastic component, its design, load conditions, and assembly method are equally important when assessing the suitability of a material for use in low-temperature applications. Minimum service temperature is simply one data point to consider.

For help determining which material is best for your low-temperature application, the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials support team is standing by to assist you.

Minimum Service Temperature

*of Some Common Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Engineering Plastics

Material [°C] [°F]
Duratron® CU60 PBI -50 -60
Duratron® D7000 PI -50 -60
Duratron® T4203 PAI -150 -240
Ketron® 1000 PEEK -60 -75
Techtron® 1000 PPS -30 -20
Fluorosint® 207 PTFE -50 -60
Fluorosint® 500 PTFE -30 -20
Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials PPSU -50 -60
Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials 1000 PSU -50 -60
Duratron® U1000 PEI -50 -60
Nylatron® PA 6 -40 -40
Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Nylon 101 PA 66 -30 -20
Acetron® GP POM-C -50 -60
Acetron® POM-H -50 -60
Ertalyte® PET-P -20 -5
TIVAR® UHMW-PE -200 -330
*Minimum allowable service temperature is determined by the extent to which the material is subjected to impact. The values given in this table are based on unfavorable impact conditions, and consequently, may not be considered as being absolute practical limits.

 

1“Brittleness temperature” is sometimes used as a measure to define the minimum service temperature of a thermoplastic, although it is more applicable to elastomers and flexible plastics. Brittleness temperature is measured by ISO 974 [Plastics -- Determination of the brittleness temperature by impact] or ASTM D 746 [Standard Test Method for Brittleness Temperature of Plastics and Elastomers by Impact]. It is described as the temperature at which plastics exhibit a 50% probability of brittle failure under specified impact conditions. Brittleness temperature data may be used to predict the behavior of plastic materials at low temperatures in applications where the conditions of deformation are similar to the test conditions as described in ISO 974 and ASTM D 746. However, these test methods do not necessarily measure the lowest temperature at which plastic materials are suitable for use.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Tech Talk
 If you enjoyed the article, check out our other Tech Talk on Temperature Resistance of Engineering Plastics.

Koen_002Koen Verhoeyen
Application Development Engineer

 

MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS’s Nylatron® NSM Helps Cornell University Baja Race Team Reduce Steering Slop

After being put in charge of designing the steering rack for this year’s Baja racecar, Cornell University student Melaney Chen (Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering '19) was determined to address the issue of steering slop. In Baja competitions, responsive and quick steering is imperative for a successful run. After experiencing bushing wear on the car in previous years, Chen went on the hunt for a material with better wear properties. What she found was Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Nylatron® NSM—a material with a low coefficient of friction and excellent wear. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials donated Nylatron® NSM to the team for use as bearings in their car’s suspension and steering system.

“Nylatron® NSM is far more machinable than metal—we can take much larger passes and can run at higher speeds on the lathe, so overall machining time is decreased. Nylatron® is also self-lubricating, which reduces wear and ensures smooth movement at moving joints (for example the ball joints and the suspension links), improving overall and long-term performance,” says Chen. “Nylatron® is strong enough for the expected loads on our bushings, and it is much lighter [than metal], so using Nylatron® allows us to cut weight,” she adds.

The race, held May 19-22 in Gorman, California, was hosted by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). After leading for the majority of the four-hour endurance race, the Cornell Baja car experienced a sub frame component failure. However, the team of 49 students left with a number of accolades, including 1st Place - Overall Design; 2nd Place - Overall Dynamics Events; 2nd Place - Suspension and Traction; 2nd Place - Maneuverability; and 3rd Place - Acceleration. Click HERE to see the Nylatron® NSM bearings in action!

The 2016-17 Cornell Baja Race Team is split into six sub-teams: drivetrain, suspension, unsprung, frame, electronics, and business. It is one of the many ‘project teams’ at Cornell University, all of which involve students in hands-on engineering projects. Other project teams build Mars rovers, rockets, and autonomous underwater vehicles. By designing and building the car from scratch, students learn the entire engineering process, including designing, modeling, analyzing, manufacturing, testing, troubleshooting, and evaluating.

“One thing I personally value highly is the experience we gain in facing mistakes and failure. We learn a lot from each mistake and work together to improve. At competition, we are faced with component failures and breakdowns that make us think on our feet and react creatively,” adds Chen.

Developed specifically for demanding applications, Nylatron® NSM outperforms all other "premium" wear grade materials. Ideal for bearings and wear pads, the material offers superior wear resistance, weight and noise reduction, corrosion resistance, and easy machining.

“…the chemical resistance of certain polymers is invaluable to industry. We, for example, use HDPE that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials also generously sponsored to do our carbon-fiber layups. We need this material for its resistance to the chemicals it would consistently see,” says Chen. “I see the evolution of polymers as a huge opportunity to develop materials that meet specific engineering needs.”

Just as Melaney and Cornell University utilized Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials to solve their problem, we invite anyone from design engineers to maintenance personnel to reach out to Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials. Bring us your part, print, or problem and we’ll work with you to provide the ideal material solution.

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James Hebel
Application Development Manager Tech Services

 

Keeping Static Under Control – MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Semitron® ESd Materials

We’ve all felt the snap of static electricity, after walking across carpet and touching a light switch or folding laundry fresh from the dryer. Now, imagine that unexpected spark in an industrial setting. Not good!

Contact or continuous rubbing of two insulative materials can produce potentially dangerous arcing. This is because static build up is insulated against finding a path to discharge from the mating contact surfaces. Most plastic materials are “insulators” (typically described as having a Surface Resistivity of > 1012 ohm/square) and are prone to this problem. As a result, static control solutions are typically required in applications such as sensitive electrical assembly fixturing or chip carriers; high-speed printer parts; medical electronic assemblies; and material handling components.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is an industry leader in providing specially formulated materials for electrostatic dissipation (ESD). Our Semitron® ESd family of materials help control and manage static electricity through specially compounded insulative base materials and fillers, providing safe, cost/performance options for a variety of ESD needs:

  • Semitron® ESd 225 Static Dissipative Acetal – This tan, acetal-based material has a surface resistivity range of 109 - 1010 ohm/square, making it an excellent general purpose fixturing material for applications up to 225F with good wear resistance.
  • Semitron® ESd 300 Static Dissipative PET-P – This black, polyester-based compound has a surface resistivity range of 106 – 109 ohm/square. It is an excellent step up product from Semitron ESd225 if you are looking for a material with low moisture absorption, higher stiffness, improved dimensional stability, or tighter machined tolerances. It can meet your ESD needs up to 240F.
  • Semitron® ESd 410C Static Dissipative PEI – With a lower resistivity range of 103 – 106 ohm/square, this black, polyetherimide-based material is capable of bleeding away a surface charge faster than previous grades; offers improved tight tolerance machining and stiffness; and will perform in your applications up to 410F.
  • Semitron® ESd 420 Static Dissipative PEI – This PEI grade offers more dissipative properties than the Semitron® ESd 410C. With a surface resistivity of 106 – 109 ohm/square, it will operate effectively at temps up to 410F. Most effective in incidental contact applications.
  • Semitron® ESd 480 Static Dissipative PEEK – This PEEK grade is a step up from the previous grades, exhibiting excellent chemical resistance, low moisture absorption, high stiffness, and excellent machinability, with a surface resistivity range of 106 – 109. It is black in color and can be used in applications up to 500F.
  • Semitron® ESd 500HR Static Dissipative PTFE – With an excellent combination of low frictional properties and dimensional stability, this PTFE grade is an ideal replacement for standard PTFE where a controlled bleed of static charges is desired. It is white in color, with a surface resistivity of 1010 – 1012 ohm/square, and can be used in applications up to 500F.
  • Semitron® ESd 520HR Static Dissipative PAI – This is Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s highest temperature ESD material, good for applications up to 510F. With a surface resistivity of 1010 – 1012, this compound has the unique ability to resist dielectric breakdown at high voltages (>100 volts), making it an ideal material for automated test handlers.

Say goodbye to static with Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Semitron® ESd family of materials. For additional help determining which material is best for your application, the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials support team is standing by to assist you.

 


Gary Clauss
- Application Development Manager/Yorba Linda, CA

 

Material Selection Made Easy with the MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS Triangle

Searching for the perfect thermoplastic material for your application? Look no further than Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials (EPP) Materials Triangle. We developed the Materials Triangle (as well as its corresponding free app) as a way for customers to differentiate between our vast product portfolios and locate their ideal polymer. Let’s break it down.

As seen above, the Triangle is split into two sides—amorphous and semi-crystalline. While amorphous materials (left side) have a very random structure, crystalline and semi-crystalline materials (right side) have a more ordered structure. These structures, whether random or ordered, yield certain properties that can come into play when used in different applications. Understanding the properties of each type of material will help you see the pros and cons of different thermoplastics on each side of the Triangle and select accordingly.

Amorphous materials

Amorphous materials have good dimensional stability, impact resistance, and heat resistance to hot water and steam. These materials can be autoclaved without degrading the polymer and have a glass transition (Tg) temperature, which gives them the ability to be thermoformed and bonded.

At the same time, amorphous materials tend to have less chemical resistance and are prone to cracking when exposed to certain harsh chemicals. However, this poor chemical resistance results in a better ability to bond (polymers are often solvent bonded). Amorphous materials have poor wear resistance, so for dynamic applications, semi-crystalline materials can be a much better option.

Semi-crystalline materials

Semi-crystalline perform well in dynamic applications—they provide very good stiffness, strength at temperature, low friction-COF, and excellent chemical resistance. While semi-crystalline materials do have an amorphous piece to their makeup, their more rigid, pure crystalline structure gives them a specific melting temperature that makes them very difficult to thermoform.

Understanding the differences between amorphous and semi-crystalline materials can help you select the perfect material for your application. When in doubt, check the Triangle!

 

Click HERE to utilize the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Online Material Selection Tool

Click HERE to Download the FREE Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Plastics Selector App

 

 


Jesse Garcia
- Application Development Engineer / South Central US Territory

 

Creep No Further: Fluorosint® – MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS’s “PTFE with Muscles”

Under extreme pressure and temperatures, some polymers are subject to deformation, commonly referred to as “creep.” Creep comes into play particularly with Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). While virgin PFTE has excellent chemical resistance, dielectric strength, the lowest COF of any solid, and a wide temperature range (-450 F to +500 F), it cannot be cross-linked like an elastomer. This means the material has no memory and can experience creep.

To mitigate creep, many material producers began creating filled versions of PTFE. Typical fillers include bronze, glass, molybdenum disulfide, stainless steel, and graphite. While these fillers do improve creep resistance (to some extent), filled PTFE can present other issues—including abrasiveness to mating materials, contamination to clean requirements, and altering the dielectric strength of the base polymer.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials has developed a solution to creep with our series of Fluorosint® materials. We call this line our “PTFE with Muscles” because it’s used for some of the most demanding and critical applications across numerous industries. We use a proprietary process in which synthetically manufactured mica is chemically linked to the PTFE. This bonding process results a polymer that has excellent dimensional stability and resistance to deformation under load while still maintaining the very low frictional properties that industries have come to expect of a PTFE-based material.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Fluorosint® family of materials are an ideal way to gain deformation resistance and stability while still maintaining a very slick, low coefficient of friction and wear performance of a PTFE-based material:

  • Fluorosint® 135 – Offering the lowest wear rate and extremely chemically inert. Applications include compressor piston rings, pump and valve wear parts, seals, bearings, thrust washers, rider bands, and packing sets.
  • Fluorosint® 207  – An FDA-compliant version offering excellent creep resistance and a very low coefficient of friction. Applications include seals, mixers, pumps, appliances, bearings, and valve seals.
  • Fluorosint® 500  – Featuring nine times greater resistance to deformation under load than an unfilled PTFE. The high level of mica used in this grade makes it an effective replacement for traditional metal (high pressure) seals and wear parts.
  • Fluorosint® HPV  – An FDA-compliant material optimized for high PV conditions while offering very low “K” wear factor. Ideal for high performance bearings, bushings, and seals where higher loads and minimal wear is required.
  • Fluorosint® MT-01  – Our most extreme grade of material, delivering performance at elevated temperatures for aggressive service components where strength and stability are expected.

When standard blends just aren’t making the cut, look to Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Fluorosint® family of “PTFE with Muscles” for a proprietary material that will cut creep while offering an excellent combination of low frictional properties and dimensional stability.

 


Jesse Garcia
- Application Development Manager/South Central US Territory

 

Coal Bunker Liner Intact and Running Smoothly for 20+ Years (Thanks to TIVAR® 88-2)

Picture this: A Midwestern coal power generating station in Wisconsin is commissioned and built in the mid-1960s. The station features six coal-fired units, burning sub-bituminous coal, with a total generating capacity of 387 megawatts.

With the passage of amendments to the Clean Air Act,, the plant made the switch from bituminous coal to low-sulfur sub-bituminous coal. This transition led to the plant facing new challenges in handling and storing fuel. Sub-bituminous coal has a higher concentration of fines and increased moisture content, making it more cohesive. Instead of flowing through the funneled fuel storage bunkers, coal built up, adhering to the gunite surface of the bunkers. As anyone who works in the coal industry knows, stagnant coal creates the perfect storm for spontaneous combustion and bunker fires.

In 1992, an accident took place at Midwestern station when coal dust was being back-filled into the bunker while a hot pocket of coal was present. The conveyor floor and roof were damaged in the accident, and employees also suffered injuries.

Enter Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials, with a plan to alleviate coal flow problems and avoid future accidents. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials experts recommended a conversion from the existing funnel flow to mass flow, which required the addition of valley angle clean-out plates and resurfacing of sloping walls with TIVAR® 88-2 liners. In 1995, two of the 750-ton coal bunkers were retrofitted with steel clean-out plates and half-inch thick TIVAR® 88-2 Liners —achieving mass flow.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s TIVAR® 88 was specifically designed for applications in the bulk material handling field, featuring a very low coefficient of friction and excellent abrasion and corrosion resistance (which helps materials flow smoothly and freely). This eliminates arching, rat-holing, or the need for other flow promotion devices. TIVAR® 88-2 is a weldable formulation of TIVAR ® 88, featuring the same high quality characteristics.

Fast-forward 21 years, to 2016. The Midwestern coal power generating station, with its TIVAR® 88-2 bunker liners, is still performing smoothly. Coal stagnation and the risk of bunker fires have been eliminated, allowing the station to produce energy safely and efficiently, while complying with all regulations. Now that’s what we call success.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s System TIVAR® Engineering is able to provide lining solutions specific to each individual case(project) including on-site analysis, liner design, pre-fabrication of kits, optional supervision or turnkey installation, anywhere around the globe, from small to large scale. Please consult our case history handbook for additional examples of successfully implemented projects. Contact our local Engineering Team TODAY!


KAT MEDFORD
- Product Development Manager and Market Development

 

MACHINING TIPS: Critical Aspects to Grinding – Surface Finishes

The key to any grinding operation is achieving your desired surface finish. The finish of a ground plastic is extremely dependent on the following factors:

  • Wheel Grit

Wheel grit is the most critical factor in obtaining your desired surface finish. A grinding wheel with a rougher grit will remove more material per pass, but the result is a rougher surface finish. A finer grit will remove less material per pass, but give you a smoother finish. The drawback to a finer grit is the potential for clogging of the wheel and over heating of the plastic which results in burnishing or burning of the surface. One needs to balance the choice of wheel grit with desired job speed and resulting surface finish. A popular recommended choice is a seventy-grit wheel. A lower grit number equates to a rougher grit. A higher number equates to a finer grit.

Some grinding wheels have more than a one size of grit per wheel and are helpful in first step material removal and second step surface finishing all in one pass through the grinder. A very commonly used example of a 2-step (duel grit) grinding wheel is a 36/60. This means that the first half of the wheel will be a 36-grit for more material removal and the second half of the wheel will have a 60-grit for finer material removal and a resulting smoother surface finish. There are also 3-step grinding wheels such as a 36/54/120. In this example the 120 grit is very fine and while providing an excellent finish, one will need to feed the material faster to avoid gumming up the wheel with removal debris.

While there are different make-ups of grinding wheel abrasives…an aluminum- oxide wheel is sufficient for most thermoplastic materials and highly recommended.

  • Feed Rate

Another factor in determining an acceptable surface finish is the feed-rate. For a cylindrical or surface grinder, the feed-rate is determined by the speed of the table. For a centerless grinder, the feed-rate is determined by the angle and rpm of the regulating wheel. For the grinding of most plastics, a suggested feed-rate is fourteen to thirty-two ft/min (4.27 to 9.75 m/min). Recommended feed-rates will vary depending on the hardness of the material being ground. Harder materials can run faster, while softer materials will need to be run slower. Keep in mind that the length of rod, plate, or tube to be ground also can affect feed-rate. For longer shapes, adjusting to a slower rate may result in improving the surface finish.

One should expect to adjust feed-rate to optimize surface finish and production time. Too fast a feed-rate will result in a poor surface finish. Too slow a feed-rate will result in increased heat generation at the material surface and burnishing of the plastic. Keep in mind that improper and aggressive feed-rates can also affect the life of the grinding wheel. Too slow and you will experience premature wear of the wheel and loss of tolerance control.

Grinding Feed-rates for Plastic Materials

screen-shot-2017-01-03-at-4-08-18-pm

  • Coolant

Coolant is required with all grinding methods as this reduces heat generation at the material surface. Grinding dry or without a coolant is not recommended. The use of a flood coolant will flush away the plastic debris and help eliminate burning of the material surface, while also improving the finish and prolonging the life of the grinding tool (Figure 2). A water soluble coolant is recommended to eliminate the potential of any chemical attack on amorphous plastics which can be susceptible to cracking and crazing from aggressive solvents and chemicals. Traditional metal-working coolants contain high levels of “amines” which act as rust inhibitors and can result in chemical attack of some plastics.

Most grinders operate with a closed loop coolant system that requires filtration of the coolant. Otherwise, in a very short time period the coolant becomes contaminated with the plastic debris/powder and looses its effectiveness. The use of a cartridge style micro-filter is recommended to catch the fines. A 20-micron filter should be sufficient for most plastics. Often a second layer of protection to catch larger particles is taken through the use of a simple filter paper set-up. A 55 or 60 micron (55 or 60 µm) filter is typical and this will help to prevent premature clogging of the micro-filter (Figure 3). Regular cleaning of the filter media is critical and timing is dependent on the material being ground.

  • Material Removal Rate

How much material being removed per pass over the grinding wheel is also critical to the desired out come. For typical plastics like nylons (polyamide - PA) and acetals (polyoxymethylene – POM) one can expect to successfully remove approximately 0.030 in. (0.76 mm) of material per pass. Harder plastics like poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and poly-amide-imide (PAI) require less material removal per pass for optimal finish. For these materials it is recommended to not take more then 0.010 to 0.015 in. (0.25 to 0.38 mm) of material per pass.

For extremely soft materials, like a PTFE (poly-tetra-fluor-ethylene) based product, one should expect some trial and error to optimize performance and finish. A heavier grit (~54 grit) with a lower feed-rate will allow the coolant to clean-out this softer debris and keep the heat generation at the surface reduced for an improved finish.

  • Tolerance and Surface Finish

For most grinders, one can expect to hold an OD tolerance of + 0.0005 inches (0.013 mm). If aggressive conditions are being utilized and clogging of the surface is occurring, then one can expect to experience tolerances in the range of + 0.003 inches (0.076 mm).

It should be noted that when grinding tubular bar one may be concerned about concentricity of the tube wall. Use of a centerless grinder will not affect concentricity. Regarding concentricity, what you start with will be what you end with. However, use of a center grinder could actually improve tube concentricity.

Most grinders will easily provide a surface finish (roughness) of thirty-two RMS. By optimizing operating conditions and following the guidelines noted above, finishes in the range of eight to sixteen RMS are achievable. Finally, for high luster finishing, a three-step grinding wheel (36/60/120 grit) may be utilized. To achieve the highest luster, a buffing wheel could be added as the material leaves the grinder for a final polish. Given the number of factors involved with grinding thermoplastic materials, a little trial and error should be expected in order for one to obtain desired results.

TABLE 2: Grinding Parameters for Plastics

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For additional MACHINING TIPS, MATERIAL OVERVIEWS, INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS and so much MORE.  Explore the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials ONLINE VIDEO LIBRARY Today…http://video.plasticperspectives.com/


JIM HEBEL
- Application Development and Technical Service Manager

 

MACHINING TIPS: Grinding of Plastics with Refrigeration Assistance

Grinding plastics can pose a problem due to the generation of heat and the subsequent softening of the plastic, particularly if the material is thin-walled or overly flexible. As the plastic softens from the heat, the grinding wheel will clog and load up generating more friction and then melting at the part surface, resulting in very poor surface finish and a grinding wheel that will require significant dressing to clear the clogged material. Freezing the plastic prior to grinding can alleviate the overheating by making the material harder and more brittle as well as cool. Parts may be kept in a chest freezer near the grinding machine and then fixtured and ground. Engineered parts may be limited in size and shape to fit inside commercial chest freezers. Repeated freezing may be necessary where the stock removal is high. In some very specialized situations cryogenic fluids may be applied to the grinding zone to provide a more consistent cooling of the interface between the grinding wheel and the plastic surface. The proper use of a cryogenic grinding fluid, however, can be very expensive to implement and control. Having parts kept in a chest freezer is a far less expensive option.

*Some plastics can experience a significant change in size due to the temperature gradient from the freezer to ambient temperature; thinner parts may become brittle and crack so it is important to be aware of these effects prior to grinding with this method.

For additional MACHINING TIPS, MATERIAL OVERVIEWS, INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS and so much MORE.  Explore the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials ONLINE VIDEO LIBRARY Today…http://video.plasticperspectives.com/


JIM HEBEL
- Application Development and Technical Service Manager

 

MACHINING TIPS: Machine Set-Up for Grinding

Cylindrical grinding and surface grinding typically utilize a single rotating “grinding” wheel; therefore, these two methods tend to be less critical than centerless grinding. Unacceptable finishes are more a symptom of the machine condition or set-up. As long as the plastic is properly held or fixtured in place, the grinder will make sure the rotating wheel does its job.

With a centerless grinder, set up is extremely important. This type of grinder uses two rotating wheels…a grinding wheel and a “regulating” wheel. The regulating wheel is non-abrasive and is strictly used to feed the rod or tube and apply force pushing it against the grinding wheel as it passes through. Proper set-up of the centerless grinder helps to ensure proper tolerance control and consistent circularity of the finished rod or tube. In this dual wheel grinder, the wheels are located in parallel, side-by-side. The spacing between these two wheels is adjustable and determines how much material is removed per pass. The position of the rod or tube being ground, as it passes between the wheels, is critical. This position is determined by the height of the “work-rest-blade”. This blade sits under and between the wheels and should be set such that the position of the material passing between the rotating wheels falls directly on-center with the wheels to no more than one sixteenth inch above center. When centerless grinding, as the rod or tube is ground and the outside diameter (OD) is reduced, you may need to continue adjusting the work-rest-blade to keep the center of the material positive versus the rotating wheels.

For most grinders the size and speeds of the rotating wheels are not adjustable and run at a consistent RPM. The type and style of the machine determines the size and configuration of the grinding wheel. In a centerless grinder, the regulating wheel is adjustable. The angle position and speed of the regulating wheel determines the feed-rate of the rod. A typical set-up angle for the regulating wheel is three degrees.

For additional MACHINING TIPS, MATERIAL OVERVIEWS, INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS and so much MORE.  Explore the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials ONLINE VIDEO LIBRARY Today…http://video.plasticperspectives.com/

 


JIM HEBEL
- Application Development and Technical Service Manager

 

TECH TALK:Temperature Resistance of Engineering Plastics

Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT) versus Continuous Service Temperature

A plastic material’s temperature resistance is broadly characterized by both its ‘temperature of deflection under load’ or ‘Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT)’ and its ‘Continuous Service Temperature’.

The ‘temperature of deflection under load’ or ‘Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT)’, is the temperature at which a standard test bar, loaded to a specified bending stress, deflects by a given value as the temperature is raised at a uniform specified rate. It is related to a certain level of stiffness at elevated temperature.

  • The ‘temperature of deflection under load’ according to ISO 75 is the temperature at which a test bar (4 x 10 x 80 mm), loaded to the specified bending stress (method A: 1.8 MPa), deflects by 0.34 mm (tested in the flatwise position and 64 mm span).
  • The ‘Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT)’ according to ASTM D 648 is the temperature at which a test bar (127 x 13 x 3 to 13 mm / 5 in. x ½ in. x ⅛ to ½ in.) loaded to the specified bending stress (0.455 or 1.82 MPa / 66 or 264 psi), deflects by 0.25 mm / 0.010 in. (tested in the flatwise position and either 100 or 101.6 mm / 3.937 or 4 in. span).

The ‘temperature of deflection under load’ or ‘Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT)’, is quite often misunderstood. This temperature value does not represent the maximum allowable service temperature of a material, although it is often considered as the maximum temperature limit for moderately to highly stressed, unconstrained components.

In the case of plastic components subjected to very little or no load at higher temperature, one should consider the continuous service temperature as a key characteristic (rather than the HDT) to make a proper material selection.

The ‘Continuous Service Temperature’ is generally reported as the temperature above which significant, permanent physical property degradation occurs after long term exposure. This value is most commonly defined as the maximum ambient service temperature (in air) that a material can withstand and retain at least 50% of its initial physical properties after long term service (approximately 10 years).

Most thermoplastics can withstand short-term exposure to higher temperatures without significant deterioration but the maximum temperature should not exceed the glass transition temperature of amorphous thermoplastics or the melting temperature of semi-crystalline thermoplastics.

Note, however, that the Continuous Service Temperature depends in many cases essentially on the duration and the magnitude of the mechanical stresses to which the material is subjected or in other words on the maximum deformation one can allow in a given application. When selecting materials for components operating at higher temperatures and subjected to load, both the Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT) and Continuous Service Temperature need to be considered.

Please consult Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s technical literature or product data sheets for temperature resistance ‘ratings’ [Heat Deflection Temperature (HDT) and Continuous Service Temperature] or reach out to Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Technical Team for support.


Koen_002Koen Verhoeyen
- Application Development Engineer

 

MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS’s Commitment to Sustainability: ECO Grade Performance Plastics

One of the most critical challenges facing the global business community is sustainability. At Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials, we recognize and support innovation that drives energy and resource efficiency; reduces emissions; develops a more sustainable infrastructure; and, ultimately, encourages job creation. With each product we develop, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials strives to reduce the use of energy, water, and materials, creating solutions that build successful, profitable business for our customers, coworkers, and environment.

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-12-49-05-pmSustainability is of the utmost importance because Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials supports the idea of KAITEKI—a concept led by our parent company, Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings Group (MCHG). KAITEKI represents “a sustainable condition which is comfortable for people, society and the Earth, transcending time and generations.” Japanese for “comfort,” KAITEKI defines the long-term direction of MCHG, aiming to balance three core management dimensions: economics, technology, and sustainability. The approach of both Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials and MCHG is to develop sustainable systems that solve business, environmental, and social issues in coexistence with the planet.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s ECO (recyclable) grades of performance plastics are just one example of our commitment to sustainability and KAITEKI. As the leading global manufacturer of high-performance thermoplastic materials, we believe that the best way to encourage the development of environmentally friendly materials (manufactured in an environmentally responsible manner) is to lead by example.

TIVAR® ECO UHMW-PE

recycledplastic-img_4194TIVAR® ECO is partially composed of reprocessed PE-UHMW material and has an overall lower property level than virgin TIVAR® 1000. Our TIVAR® ECO grade shows a favorable price-performance ratio for applications in many kinds of industries with less demanding requirements.  Product Data Sheet / Safety Data Sheet

Product Overview:

  • Meets FDA and USDA guidelines; 3-A Dairy-approved (natural)
  • Reduces noise
  • Self-lubricating
  • Chemical-, corrosion- and wear-resistant
  • No moisture absorption
  • Non-toxic, low-friction surface
  • Meets ASTM-D-4020-05 of 3.1 to 6.2-million molecular weight

Applications:

  • Wear strips, wear rails, wear guides
  • Channels
  • Rollers
  • Conveyor and conveying equipment
  • Lining applications:  chutes, hoppers

DURAPRO

duraproMitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s DURAPRO™ is an industrial strength reprocessed polymer liner designed to outwear both aluminum and steel in most applications. DURAPRO™ continuous length, seamless dump body liners release sticky materials in the very best and very worst conditions, eliminating costly flow agents, reducing labor costs, and increasing the number of loads hauled each day. Manufactured from reprocessed UHMW and available in 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" thicknesses, DURAPRO liners protect the integrity of original dump truck bed while handling clay, coal, fertilizer, flyash, gravel, limestone, and rock. Product Flyer / Product Data Sheet / Safety Data Sheet

trucklinerProduct Overview:

  • Provides steady release of bulk materials
  • Abrasion-, corrosion-, and chemical-resistant
  • High impact strength
  • Outlasts aluminum in most applications
  • Economically priced
  • Weighs less than aluminum or steel

Applications:

  • Dump Trailers
  • Dump Bodies
  • Bottom Dumps
  • Gravel Trains
  • Transfer Dumps (floor & wall pkgs.)

As an innovative manufacturing company, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials has the experience and expertise to live and work in ways that help protect (or even enhance) our lives, our safety, and our environment. We are committed to the safety of our coworkers, the production of the highest quality materials, and supporting causes that are important to our clients and our parent company. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials specialty engineering thermoplastics and composites are superior in performance to metals and other materials—through the introduction of ECO thermoplastics such as TIVAR® ECO UHMW-PE and DURAPRO™, we will continue to innovate sustainability for a better future.

 

 

 

8,000 Parts in a Single Wind Turbine: Bring on the Thermoplastics

With 8,000 parts in a single wind turbine, it’s smart for everyone if those pieces are working together seamlessly. For wind farm managers, maximizing productivity and preserving energy are key. For anyone on the ground (or, climbing ladders hundreds of feet into the sky to do turbine maintenance), seeing a machine that weighs anywhere from 150 to 350 tons immediately brings safety to the forefront.

According to the Global Wind Energy Council, there were over 314,000 wind turbines spinning around the world at the end of 2015. This number is only expected to continue growing over the next 35 years, as renewable energy generation helps to fill the increasing global demand for electricity. In an industry expected to employ over 520,000 people by 2020, it is imperative that manufacturers take innovative approaches to increasing output while adhering to strict safety regulations.

Recently, the manager of a wind farm contacted Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials for assistance eliminating a performance and maintenance problem. The bearing surfaces in the positioning system of each turbine were rapidly failing, due to weather, temperature, and mechanical load. These strains were causing the units to make very loud noises, and required an employee to climb a 260-foot ladder—no matter the weather—to apply a lubricant to the unit’s stuck bearings. During each episode of bearing failure, the company experienced capacity loss due to the broken turbines as well as extra costs for emergency maintenance—clearly not a sustainable model.

ketron_hpv_peek1With the help of Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s application specialists and technical experts, a grade of Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Ketron® PEEK HPV was identified as the perfect solution for the bearing problem. Ketron® PEEK HPV offered the ideal combination of lubricity, load bearing capability, low coefficient of friction, and eliminated noise.

shutterstock_326581121As demonstrated in this case study, thermoplastics can be substituted for steel, aluminum, or ceramic parts. Engineered thermoplastics are lighter, helping to cut down on the weight of the wind turbine overhead, self-lubricating, and help with noise reduction. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s materials are extensively tested and specially designed to thrive in harsh chemical and extreme thermal conditions. This means less abrasion, erosion, and wear, resulting in increased equipment lifetime, increased time between repairs, and a reduction in waste and replacement needs.

With $109 billion dollars invested globally, wind power is one of the fastest growing industry segments in the world. By replacing metal parts with high-performing thermoplastics, manufacturers can maximize performance and energy output while protecting those investments. Components made from Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials support innovative technical development in all major sectors of alternative energy generation, helping leaders worldwide to maximize productivity and safety both today and far into the future.

Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is deeply committed to building application success in emerging alternative energy fields such as wind and solar. Our extensively tested materials are able to operate under harsh chemical and extreme thermal conditions. Because of their high specific strength, our thermoplastics can be substituted for steel, aluminum, or ceramic—reducing the weight of that wind turbine towering overhead. Noise reduction? We can help with that, too.

Click here to visit the main Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials website for more information.

TIGHT LINES: MAKING TOP WATER LURES FROM TIVAR® UHMW-PE

A classical popper is a hollow lure that as the angler jerks the rod "pops" along the surface using its concave head which in turn throws bubbles and splashes, because of this design these lures are difficult to cast far into the surf and heavy to retrieve.

Rafael Garcia-Zuazua (a customer in our Mexico region) had the idea to make a top water lure that could be cast far and perform the "pop and splash" action as the classical one. Experienced anglers know how critical distance is when surf fishing.

Garcia-Zuazua experimented using Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s NYLAMID® material in rod form 1" Dia. X 7" long. Turning and shaping the material in a wood lathe with manual gouges proved difficult to machine. Due to the hardness of the material, he made just a few that fished great.

Quest sales department in Mexico recommended Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s TIVAR® material advising Garcia-Zuazua that it was much easier to machine and that the color was whiter than NYLAMID®.

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TIVAR® UHMW-PE Benefits

  • Excellent abrasion resistance
  • No moisture absorption
  • Corrosion resistant
  • Excellent impact strength

QUA Popper 4

 

The TIVAR® popper is 2.6 oz X 6.5" long and can be cast easily 250'+ using a 12 ' rod with 30 to 50 lbs. test braided line it can also be cast from a boat with a smaller rod.

 

 

QUA Popper 3This lure is also comfortable to retrieve, at medium to fast speed the lure moves like a distressed fish triggering the predator species (coastal and pelagic) to strike. This medium/fast retrieve allows the angler to see the fish(s) coming usually from behind making a large turmoil in the water surface, this view is by far one of the most exciting experiences an angler can have specially if you manufacture your own lure.

 


QUA Popper ImageThank you for the opportunity to share this experience with you. Tight lines!
Rafael Garcia-Zuazua

 

 

TIVAR® PROFILES : CONVEYING COMPONENTS

TIVAR® profiles are available in many standard shapes, but can also be custom designed to meet your application needs. Our engineers and specialists can work with you to create your own custom design. These energy-saving polymers; reduce friction & wear, improve productivity & fill the performance gap left by traditional materials.

conveyor_brochure

Premium Formulations

Key Benefits

  • TIVAR® wearstrips are easy to install and offer superior life for conveyor belts, chains and other moving machinery or products
  • TIVAR® can reduce noise levels up to 50%
  • TIVAR® is 1/8 the weight of steel, but can outwear 3:1 for most conveyor applications.
  • TIVAR® is sanitary and self-lubricating

Applications

  • Bottling/Packaging
  • Transportation
  • Chemical Processing
  • Food Processing
  • Industrial/Heavy Equipment
  • Medical/Pharmaceutical
  • Water Treatment

Click HERE to download the New TIVAR® PROFILES : CONVEYING COMPONENTS Brochure

TECH TALK: Thermal Expansion of Engineering Plastics

Like most other solid materials, engineering thermoplastic materials expand upon heating and contract when cooled. Thermal expansion and contraction must be taken into consideration when designing constructions/assemblies composed of materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion which can or will be exposed to (high) temperature changes or when the plastic components have to meet stringent tolerances over a wide temperature range.
It also has to be noted that thermal expansion can cause significant stresses in a component or can lead to undesirable deformation in case the design does not allow for proper expansion and contraction of the components (example see Fig. 1).

Koen Blog 1
Fig. 1: a UHMW-PE wear strip bolted to a steel substrate near the outlet of an oven having a temperature of up to 300°C/570°F during operation.

[caption id="attachment_2734" align="aligncenter" width="443"]Koen Blog 2 Figure 2[/caption]

The COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR THERMAL EXPANSION (CLTE) is a material property indicating the extent to which a material expands upon heating. The CLTE of thermoplastic materials is generally not a constant but varies with temperature (example see Figure 2: CLTE of Ketron 1000 PEEK as a function of temperature). Average values of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion within specified temperature ranges of the Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials are given in the product data sheets and Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s technical literature.

Calculation of linear thermal expansion:
Koen Blog 3equation

EXAMPLE:
A Ketron 1000 PEEK sleeve bearing OD 127 mm / 5 in. x ID 101.6 mm / 4 in. x Length 76.2 mm / 3 in. assembled in a steel housing at room temperature (20°C / 68°F) is going to be retained by means of a steel flange in order to prevent axial displacement.
What’s the minimum width S of the gap between sleeve bearing and steel flange in order to prevent the bearing from buckling in case the environmental temperature could rise up to maximum 150°C/302°F?
[CLTE of Ketron 1000 PEEK between room temperature and 150°C/302°F: 55 x 10-6 m/(m.K) or 30.6 x 10-6 in./in./°F]

Screenshot 2016-04-13 11.00.29
ANSWER: 0.55 mm / 0.0215 in.
Please note that enough clearance between shaft and inside diameter of the bearing should be provided in order to prevent the bearing from seizing on the shaft during operation at high temperature.

Please consult Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Design & Fabrication Reference Guide for proper bearing clearance to be applied at assembly or contact Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s Technical Service Department for support.


 

Koen_002Koen Verhoeyen
- Application Development Engineer

NEW Design & Fabrication Reference Guide

cover
Over the years we’ve heard many times from design engineers and
cutting edge fabricators how much they’ve relied on Our
Design & Fabrication Reference Guide as a valued resource.
Yet – as you well know – the world of design and fabrication changes
constantly, so much so that we decided it was time to update
our guide for 2017. Download the all-new guide here.


Yes, we’re biased, but we believe machinable plastics are superior to metals in design and fabrication because they reduce weight, eliminate corrosion, reduce noise, improve wear performance, and for increasing a part’s life.

As in its previous version, this updated resource provides you with specific information regarding plastic and polymer innovators; plastics/polymer properties; information for selecting the right material for your products; chemical data; regulatory information and product compliance; fabrication guidelines, post machine annealing, and more.

In addition, the NEW 2016 edition profiles the meaning of physical property testing, as well as gear, bearings, sheave and roller/wheel design. You’ll also find charts that summarize tool geometries. Speeds also are provided for all of Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials’s materials.

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Engineers and manufacturers can choose from more than 50 grades of machinable plastic, in shapes ranging from tubular bar, rod, sheet and tube. These plastic grades span the price and performance ranges from both ferrous and non-ferrous metals to specialty plastics.

Excessive heat isn’t problem: plastics today can handle long-term exposure of up to 800 degrees F (425 degrees C) and 1,000 degrees F (540 degrees C) in the short term.

Yet as the options increase, so does the complexity and difficulty when choosing the correct material for any individual or specific application/use.

Our Design & Fabrication Reference Guide will help you understand machinable plastics’ basic categories – and help you feel more comfortable using them.

High Performance Thermoplastics for Extreme Off-Road Racing

In the past, lubricated bronze bushings were used as suspension bearings in off-road vehicles. From the small buggies in Baja to large military vehicles, bronze was the answer.

With the advent of high performance thermoplastics and thermoplastic rubber, off road racers started moving away from bronze. The constant grind of dirt, mud, and sand between the pivot shafts and bronze bushings caused many failures when the pivot was not sealed properly. In the grueling desert elements of Baja and the Southwestern United States, a 250 mile race would cause seals to give way and bearings to wear. At each pit stop, race teams would be forced to re-lubricate the bearings as well as fuel and change tires.

In the late 70’s race teams were provided access to alternatives to bronze, cast urethane and a material from Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials known as Delrin®. The cast urethane was softer and more forgiving but Delrin® was naturally lubricated. Delrin had the durability to last the race but it too would begin to fail as racers drove faster and demanded more from their suspensions.

Engineers and end users continued to push for solutions that would eliminate the need for lubrication and solve abrasive wear issues. As an answer to this call for action, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials created an extreme bearing material known as Nylatron® NSM.

Many off road race teams and builders of off road vehicles have welcomed Nylatron® NSM as a palpable solution to lubrication and abrasive wear issues.

QUA Truck 3

Nylatron® NSM

  • PV rating 5 times that of Delrin® (15,000 versus 3,000)
  • bearings can run dry
  • wear factor 20 times better than that of Derlin®
  • suspensions can oscillate at a greater frequency
  • race teams only need to replace their suspension bushing once per year!

QUA Truck 2

Off road race vehicles using Nylatron® NSM have won many major races; the Baja 500, the “1000”, the Mint 400, and “Vegas to Reno.” Overall class champions in both “SCORE” and “Best in the Desert” use Nylatron® as well. Because of the materials longevity and its ability to take the extreme environment of desert racing, Mason Motorsports, Temecula, CA uses Nylatron® NSM as OEM equipment in all of the off road trucks they build. According to Neal Mason, “At Mason Motorsports, we build quality off road trucks. Overall strength and reliability is our goal. Nylatron NSM is an important component in our suspension. Its strength, lubricity, and reliability are key.”

Engineering Thermoplastics, especially those with performance enhancing fillers, were engineered to thrive in the extreme environments of off road racing. With a broad portfolio of bearing and wear materials, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials, provides metal to plastic conversion solutions allowing you to outperform the competition.

Click HERE to see Nylatron® NSM suspension bushings in action!


Rick_Headshots
RICK HILBLOM
Application Development Manager Tech Services/App Development

 

Turbo-Machinery Labyrinth Seals: 15 + Years of Proven Performance

[caption id="attachment_2145" align="alignleft" width="300"]The first set of seals were removed from a natural gas compressor after 11 years in service. The first set of seals were removed from a natural gas compressor after 11 years in service.[/caption]

In the Turbo-Compressor and Turbo-Machinery markets metal tooth deformation and mating shaft damage is a common occurrence when using aluminum labyrinth seals. In this application metal and alloys are also just not capable of delivering the tightest starting tolerances and further reduction in tightening tolerances that are required for maximum operational efficiency and service life.Here at Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials we're proud of being known as the “overachievers” in the engineering plastics industry. So, we worked with industry partners and OEM's to formulate the industry's best performing material, that would not sacrifice on value by delivering the longest service life – this material is Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Duratron® PAI (polyamide-imide).

Testing was recently completed on Duratron® PAI Labyrinth Seals, commonly used in the turbo compressor market. The study was the industry's first and longest continual test of its kind, delivering proof that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials's Duratron® brand seals are the most superior performing and efficient choice for oil, gas and petrochemical applications. More analysis revealed minimal wear, virtually no tooth deformation or damage to mating shafts from rubbing during normal tolerance tightening while in service.

[caption id="attachment_2146" align="alignleft" width="300"]The second seal was removed from a different compressor, which had been in service for 15 years. The second seal was removed from a different compressor, which had been in service for 15 years.[/caption]

Replacing or converting form metals and alloys to Duratron® seals in turbo compressor labyrinth seal applications will:

- Deliver a combination of high resistance to fuels

- Increase material longevity, longer service life

- Withstand harsh HPHT/HPLT environments experienced in the oil, gas and petrochemical industries

- Provide tighter initial clearances and allow for reduced clearances in-service, improving compressor efficiency and overall seal life

In evaluating Duratron® PAI seals we punished the materials overall integrity for comparison with metals and alloys. Those tests proved Duratron® exceeded the performance and value of alternate materials used in the past. After two tests over 11 and 15 years of continual service within a natural gas compressor Duratron® T4540 PAI's performance is proof that Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials is not only continually innovating engineering plastic technology but is a solution provider, a worldwide partner, to the oil, gas and petrochemical industries for smarter application solutions that never compromise in the areas of quality, value and safety.

[caption id="attachment_2144" align="alignleft" width="300"]For seals from the B-case sample, tensile strength was lower than baseline, but tensile modulus was higher. For seals from the B-case sample, tensile strength was lower than baseline, but tensile modulus was higher.[/caption]

Click here to download a PDF of the full article from Pumps & Systems Magazine.

 

 

 

 


Koen_002Koen Verhoeyen
- Application Development Engineer

The MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL ADVANCED MATERIALS SOLUTION: Metal Detectable Plastics

The foremost goal in the food production and packaging industry is to deliver high quality, healthy and SAFE products. This highly regulated market requires meeting international standards and it can quickly become a major threat to the business, if these standards are not met. Product recalls can and have resulted in worst case scenarios for producers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) just announced that West Liberty Foods is recalling approximately 34,075 pounds of grilled chicken breast products that may be contaminated with pieces of plastic. This devastating news, just on the heels of the metal contamination found in Kraft Macaroni & Cheese that created a huge media storm, drop in stock price, and loss of customer confidence. It is imperative that producers prevent contamination of food caused by e.g. breakage and wear of equipment parts. The use of metal detectors can significantly reduce the risk of such contamination issues. These issues have created a growing demand for polymer materials as a replacement of metal parts and present a strong demand for new and improved, metal detectable plastics.

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The Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials Solution
Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials has developed a wide range of traceable polymer materials, which offer superior properties compared to metal and existing plastics. Offering Manufacturer’s a broad selection of products based on the application and the most critical material quality. Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials materials offer improved impact resistance resulting in less breakage of highly stressed plastic parts in production and process equipment along with material additives that allow detection of very small (27mm3and bigger) particles via metal detectors addressing the remaining risk of occurring breakage or wear.

Services & Materials
Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials supplies stock shape materials as well as finished parts solutions for global clients in the food processing & packaging market, along with food compliance certificates for the chosen products.Our local technical service team is ready to help you providing details on materials, such as chemical resistance data, and identifying the right material for your application. Let us help you find your Solution TODAY.


 

QUA-SM-headshots_paulPAUL CANACAS
- Territory Manager of Central and Eastern Canada

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